4 R's
An easy way to take control of your online experiences. The 4 R's are:
  • Recognize techniques predators use to deceive you.
  • Refuse requests for personal information.
  • Respond assertively in uncomfortable or compromising online situations.
  • Report suspicious or dangerous contact on the Internet.
Anti-virus:
Software that helps protect a computer from malicious code.

Appropriate:
Suitable for a particular person, condition, occasion, or place - fitting.

School Assembly (ASM):
The i-SAFE Assembly Experience is a 45-minute interactive multimedia experience for grades 5-12 that speaks directly to the youth of America. With the use of lights, videos, and true-life stories, i-SAFE shows how actions in the cyber world can have serious real-world consequences. The assembly serves as a launching pad for the i-SAFE Curriculum, Drive Campaign, and the Student Mentor Program.

Assembly Experience Training (AST):
The Assembly Experience Training is a standardized means to prepare i-SAFE Student Mentors, activity coordinators, teachers, school resource officers, and others to conduct assemblies and to train others to conduct assemblies.

Attachment:
A data file that is sent from one computer to another along with an e-mail or an instant message.

Bandwidth:
Limited amount of data information that can be carried at any one time.

Bibliography:
A list of the information about works cited in a paper or article.

Brochure Distribution:
An Internet Safety Outreach Activity that allows individuals to distribute i-SAFE Internet safety brochures to let others in the community learn how to protect themselves online. The i-SAFE brochures contain Internet safety information, tips, and direct the recipient(s) to www.isafe.org if they're looking for more information.

Browser:
Software program that allows Internet users to interact with, navigate or "browse" parts of the Internet. Examples of popular browsers include Netscape and Internet Explorer.

Buddy list:
A function of most instant messaging programs, buddy lists enable users to know when people they have put on their lists are online. This makes it easier to contact people with whom users converse frequently.

Bulletin boards:
(Message boards): Public areas on the Internet where messages or comments can be posted for other board members to read and reply to.

CD-ROMs:
Compact Disc Read Only Memory. The CD holds data that only plays back information and does not record or save information.

Chat room:
A virtual room, or gathering place, for Internet users with shared interests to congregate and converse. A user enters a chat room under a screen name and types a message that is displayed to the other members in the chat room.

Chat software:
A type of Internet-based application that enables groups of people to get together in a chat room and converse in real time through typewritten messages.

Citizen:
A member of a community.

Certified Mentor Training (CMT):
The Certified Mentor Training is a standardized means to prepare i-SAFE Student Mentors, activity coordinators, teachers, school resource officers, community leaders, and others to conduct Certified Mentor Trainings. By participating in the Certified Mentor Training you will learn Internet safety practices. i-SAFE Certified Mentors are students that are trained in Internet safety and want to educate others about being responsible cyber citizens.

Code:
Written instructions in a computing language.

Community:
The physical area where we live, comprised of places where we know and interact with real people.

CAP (Community Action Plan) An outline to extend Internet safety awareness throughout the community. A CAP is used by a Community Action Team (CAT) to extend Internet safety awareness.

CAT (Community Action Team) A CAT is a group of people who work together to raise awareness of Internet safety. The goal of a CAT is to help extend awareness throughout schools and communities, and to foster growth of Youth Empowerment.

Community Leaders:
People who have the resources and ability to bring different parts of a community together to help spread Internet safety awareness. (Examples: Mayor, Police/Fire Chief, Governor, Superintendent, Business owners)

Cyber Safety Week (CSW):
Work with your local PTA to assist students as they recruit Mentors, hold a poster contest or a Speak Out, set up an information table, make a drop box for Internet advice, or plan an i-Parent Night for their school or community.

Classroom Instruction (CLI):
Includes age-appropriate integrated teaching and learning activities for grades K-8 and webcasts for high school students. Each lesson is designed to foster active participation between students and instructors through classroom discussions, and group and individual activities.

Classroom Instructor:
The Classroom Instructor teaches the i-SAFE curriculum to students.

Community Leaders Meeting (CLM) This is a meeting where Internet safety information is provided to community leaders. A CLM provides the opportunity to get involved with raising awareness of Internet safety throughout the community. A CAT is usually formed from a CLM.

Conference (CNF):
An Internet Safety Conference is a professional meeting where students, parents, educators, law enforcement, or community members share knowledge through information sessions, talks, roundtables, and workshop sessions. A conference may also provide students, parents, educators, law enforcement, or community members an opportunity to present and expose audiences to a breadth of Internet Safety information (predators, viruses, intellectual property).:

Consequence:
Something that logically or naturally follows from an action or condition.

Coordinator:
This is the person who is coordinating the media project/activity.

Copyright:
The exclusive legal rights to reproduce, publish, and sell things produced by the person who owns the copyright.

Counterfeit:
Something that is not the real thing, a fake.

Crash:
The act of a computer's operating system becoming inoperative.

Cursor:
A visually distinct mark on a display / screen indicating where newly typed text will be inserted. The cursor moves as text is typed and, in most modern editors, can be moved around within a document by the user to change the insertion point.

Cyber Grooming:
The process that online predators use to trick their victims by building false trust and relationships.

Cyberspace:
General term, coined by science fiction writer William Gibson in his fantasy novel 'Neuromancer', to describe the world connected by computers and the society that gathers around them. It refers to the virtual community on the Internet in which real people interact through electronic means.

Dangerous:
Something that is potentially harmful or risky.

Deceive:
To cause to believe what is not true; mislead.

Deception:
A ruse; a trick.

Destructive:
Designed or tending to disprove or discredit.

Download:
To copy information (data) from the Internet. Downloading usually copies an entire file from a main source to a peripheral device. The term is often used to describe the process of copying a file from an online service or bulletin board service (BBS) to one's own computer.

E-mail:
Abbreviation for electronic mail. Allows one to send messages from one computer through the Internet to one or more recipients.

End Date:
Date that final lesson will be taught.

Ethics:
The rules or standards governing the conduct of a person.

Expected Participants:
Whether your event is open or invitation only, please indicate the number of participants you are expecting to attend (e.g. per your invitations).

Facilitator:
Person who is conducting the event.

File:
The specific location of data within a computer record.

File extensions:
The three or more letters at the end of a file name. It defines the file "type", such as a text file, executable file, database file or graphic file. Example file extensions include .exe, .jpg, and .doc.

Flame:
A mean or hurtful e-mail message.

Freeze:
Situation in which computer programs cannot be accessed, usually characterized by a computer screen that cannot be changed and an inoperable cursor (mouse action).

FW:
Abbreviation for Forward. FW is an indicator located in the subject line of an email that lets the recipient know the message they received has been redirected to them from another user.

Hacker:
A person who uses the Internet to break into a computer or computer network without authorization, often causing damage.

Hacking:
Using one's knowledge of computer programming to gain illegal or unauthorized access to a computer file or network.

Harassment:
To annoy someone repeatedly. For example; a net user cursing at, following, or mocking another Internet user.

Hardware:
The physical machinery: computer, monitor, keyboard, mouse, printer, etc.

Hate mail:
Harassing and/or threatening electronic mail.

Hate site:
A website dedicated to professing and/or promoting intense hostility towards an individual or group of people.

i-Adopt-A-School (IAS):
The i-Adopt-A-School program allows for parents and community members to raise money providing i-SAFE the resources needed to inject education and outreach into your schools and community immediately.

Identifying Information:
Personal information that can be used by online predators to distinguish you from another person and possibly find you in real life. (Examples: your name, age, phone number, address, school, friend's names, & family names)

Identity Theft:
When someone uses your personal information (Examples: social security #, credit card #) to steal your identity for illegal purposes. The fastest-growing crime in the U.S.

IP (Implementation Plan):
This form is your passport to i-SAFE's program and support, without charge. An IP must be submitted, relaying your plans for each PDP, classroom instruction, or outreach activity, allowing us to provide you the necessary support and supplies and remain within our grant requirements. An IP may be submitted online, via the Quick Link on our homepage.

Inappropriate:
Not suitable for a particular person, condition, occasion, or place.

Information Table:
An Internet Safety Outreach Activity that involves setting up a table at their school, grocery store, or mall and distributing Internet safety information. i-SAFE provides the materials to be distributed.

Infringement:
A violation, as of a law, regulation, or agreement; a breach.

Instant messaging (IM):
A real time Internet communication application. While chat involves many users simultaneously, IM is one-to-one.

Instructor/Librarian's Name Instructor/Librarian:
Person who will be teaching the curriculum or hosting the Library Safe Card Program.

Intellectual Property:
Refers to materials protected by copyright laws. These materials include songs, movies, and books.

Internet:
A worldwide network of interconnected computer networks. No government agency or other central authority controls its use.

Internet Safety:
The concept of being educated and empowered to take control of your online experiences. Also involves recognizing and making smart & responsible decisions in potentially dangerous situations.

Internet Service Provider (ISP):
A vendor that provides Internet access to its customers.

Invitation Only:
These events can only be attended by those invited by the facilitator / host. A pre-assigned event code will be required in order for designated invitees to register for the event. The facilitator/host will receive this event code via an i-SAFE mail.

Conduct Letter Writing Campaign (LWC):
Promote Internet Safety by creating or joining an i-Parent Board. One of the many ways an i-Parent Board can make a difference in the community is to provide parents and adults over 50 an opportunity to write letters to the media, key decision makers, and lawmakers. Instructions on how to create or join an i-Parent Board as well as the proper way to conduct a letter writing campaign is included in the i-Parent Toolkit.

Name of Law Enforcement Instructor (for Classroom Instruction Only):
Law Enforcement Instructor: i-SAFE encourages educators to partner with a local law enforcement officer to teach the predator identification lesson (for grades 5-8) and additional lessons as determined by the instructor (for grades K-12).

Library Safe Card Program:
A computer based tutorial and quiz to ensure students are familiar with and understand acceptable 'rules of the road' when navigating the Internet. It offers a proactive tool for librarians, to be used in conjunction with the curriculum.

Looping:
The term used to describe a website that will not allow exit.

Malicious:
Means to cause harm to someone or something on purpose.

Malicious code:
A computer program that is meant to hurt you and your computer. Viruses, worms, and Trojan horses are examples of malicious code.

Maximum Capacity:
Number of participants you can accommodate: This number indicates the threshold for number of event registrants. When your event registration reaches capacity (as defined by this number), your event will be closed to additional registrants.

Mentor 'Link':
An adult (usually a teacher) in a school who helps Student Mentors organize events & activities. A 'Link' is a member of your local CAT and relays Mentors' ideas to other CAT members.

Mentors Club:
An area on the i-SAFE website where Mentors hang out. They can exchange ideas, chat with other Mentors across the U.S., and learn Internet safety information to provide to their schools and communities.

Mouse:
Hand operated computer hardware used to maneuver the cursor.

Netiquette:
A combination of the words "network" and "etiquette," used to describe the informal code of Internet conduct.

Obscene:
Offensive to accepted standards of decency or modesty.

Open to the public:
These events are open to all those interested in participating. The event will be included on the i-SAFE Calendar of Events, which allows participants to pre-register. Event registration will close when the number of participants reaches the predetermined limit specified by the facilitator.

Orientation:
A scripted PowerPoint presentation offering a brief overview of the i-SAFE Educational and Outreach components.

Outreach:
Extending valuable Internet safety information from beyond the classroom and into the school and community.

Outreach Event:
An Event, Meeting, or Conference that provides Internet safety information to the community.

i-Parent Program (PNT):
A meeting that is designed to provide parents i-SAFE Internet safety information. An i-Parent Program is the opportunity to get involved with raising Internet safety awareness throughout the community. An i-Parent Board is usually formed from an i-Parent Program.

i-Parent Training (PTT):
The i-Parent Training provides parents an opportunity to educate and conduct training sessions for other parents about online safety and introduces parents to the i-Parent Campaign.

Parental controls:
Special features or software packages that enable adults to control the online activities of children.

Password:
A secret word or series of letters and numbers that one must use to gain access to an online service, the Internet, or to modify certain software such as parental controls.

Piracy:
Robbery on the high seas; robbery from Internet sites to produce counterfeit copyrighted software and other material.

Plagiarism:
Stealing someone else's work and pretending it's yours.

Pornography:
Graphics and text that are sexual in nature, not intended for minors and illegal in some places.

Presentation
An Internet Safety Presentation provides parents, educators, law enforcement, or community members with ways to implement the i-SAFE Program. The intended audience is exposed to the Education and Outreach programs i-SAFE provides and specifically how they can get involved with i-SAFE America.

Posting:
Sending a message to an online message board to be viewed by the members of the board.

PPT (PowerPoint): Presentation software that allows slides to be shown with information. A PPT, along with a computer and a projector, are used to display i-SAFE presentations.

Program Leader:
Using i-SAFE's train-the-trainer model, the Program Leader coordinates and conducts the Professional Development Program (PDP) for others.

PSAs (Public Service Announcements): A PSA is a type of advertisement or announcement that educates people on specific issues, such as the need to be safe online.

Predator:
One who stalks or uses lies, secrecy, or stealth, to get close enough to another person in order to easily hurt or harm them.

Prey:
A victim or someone who is vulnerable to victimization. Someone who has been harmed by a person or thing.

Professional Development Program (PDP):
A national training program attended by educators and law enforcement to familiarize them with the i-SAFE's components and provide them a solid baseline of knowledge in the field of Internet safety. On completion of a PDP, attendees are i-SAFE certified and qualified to take the curriculum into the classroom, train others, and/or develop the i-SAFE program within their communities or organizations.

PDP Facilitated Via DVD Video:
A national training program attended by educators and law enforcement to familiarize them with i-SAFE's components and provide them a solid baseline of knowledge in the field of Internet safety. On completion of a PDP, attendees are i-SAFE certified and qualified to take the curriculum into the classroom, train others, and/or develop the i-SAFE program within their communities or organizations. i-SAFE offers the full PDP via DVD video format that can be presented to a group of participants. Facilitators do not need to be previously i-SAFE certified to utilize the PDP DVD.

PDP Facilitated Via PowerPoint Presentation:
A national training program attended by educators and law enforcement to familiarize them with i-SAFE's components and provide them a solid baseline of knowledge in the field of Internet safety. On completion of a PDP, attendees are i-SAFE certified and qualified to take the curriculum into the classroom, train others, and/or develop the i-SAFE program within their communities or organizations. i-SAFE offers certified trainers a four-hour scripted PowerPoint Presentation with embedded videos to train the next group of individuals.

One-Hour PDP Facilitated Via PowerPoint Presentation:
A national training program attended by educators and law enforcement to familiarize them with i-SAFE's components and provide them an introduction to the field of Internet safety. On completion of this brief PDP, attendees are i-SAFE certified and qualified to take the curriculum into the classroom and/or develop the i-SAFE program within their communities or organizations. i-SAFE offers certified trainers a one-hour scripted PowerPoint Presentation with embedded videos to train the next group of individuals or to provide an overview to school decision-makers.

PTP (Preservice Teacher Presentation):
A narrated PowerPoint orientation presentation geared for higher education which provides an overview of the safety and responsible use issues associated with Internet access, analysis of the role and responsibility of educators in addressing the issues, and how i-SAFE certification can help.

Program:
An instruction set, written in a computer language (Java, C++, Perl, etc.) that makes a computer perform an action.

Programmer:
A person who develops computer software programs.

PTG:
Parent Teacher Group Meeting/Parent Night.

Relationship:
A particular type of connection existing between people related to or having interaction with each other.

Reputable:
Something that is trusted and good.

Screen name:
Name / nickname used to identify oneself in communications on the Internet.

Search engine:
A software program that allows one to perform searches on the Internet based on terms and phrases.

Service Learning Program:
Curriculum and materials, to promote youth empowerment, citizenship, and service through projects that enable students to take what they learn about Internet safety out into the community.

Service Learning Orientation:
Presentation to introduce educators to the i-SAFE Service Learning curriculum and materials, that promote youth empowerment, citizenship, and service through projects that enable students to take what they learn about Internet safety out into the community.

Software:
A computer program.

SPAM:
Also known as Internet junk mail, SPAM is mass mailing (or mass-posting) of messages that are irrelevant to the groups and recipients who receive them. SPAM is considered a serious breach of Netiquette.

Stalk:
To obsessively pursue a person from place to place on the Internet, attempting to find out personal information.

Start Date:
Date that the initial lesson will be taught.

Steganography:
A technology that makes it possible to embed hidden information in documents, pictures, and music files ñ and send them undetected over the Internet.

Teacher Mentor Program (TMP):
The Teacher Mentor Program is a standardized means to prepare activity coordinators, teachers, school resource officers, and others to coordinate with students to start the i-SAFE Student Mentor Program. I-SAFE Student Mentor Program will provide students an opportunity to learn Internet safety information to provide to their schools and communities.

Town Hall Meeting (THM):
Town Hall Meeting where i-SAFE Internet safety information is provided to community leaders in an open forum. A Town Hall Meeting provides the opportunity to get involved with raising awareness of Internet safety throughout the community. A Community Action Team is usually formed from a Town Hall Meeting.

Trojan horse:
Malicious code that appears harmless but, when executed, can launch a virus or worm.

URL:
Defined as Universal/Uniform Resource Locator, is another name for a Web address. The URL is located at the top of a webpage and generally begins with http://www.

Virus:
Executable code (computer program) that infects or attaches itself to other executable code (computer programs) to perform a malicious or mischievous act such as erasing/editing files or locking up systems.

Virtual Professional Development Program (VPDP):
A national training program for educators, Administrators and law enforcement offered through the online Virtual Training Academy. The Virtual PDP will familiarize them with i-SAFE's components and provide them with a solid baseline of knowledge about Internet safety. On completion of a Virtual PDP, attendees are i-SAFE certified and qualified to take the curriculum into the classroom, train others, and/or develop the i-SAFE program within their communities or organizations.

Virtual Parent Train the Trainer (VPTT):
The online i-PARENT Training provides parents an opportunity to be educated on internet safety and cyber security. It also allows parents the ability to take the information learned and conduct training sessions for other parents about online safety and introduce parents to the i-PARENT Campaign. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Assembly Training for Advisors (VASTA):
The online Assembly Experience Training for Advisors is a standardized means to prepare student activity coordinators, teachers, school resource officers, and others to conduct school assemblies and train others to do the same. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Certified i-MENTOR Training for Advisors (VCMTA):
The online Certified i-MENTOR Training for Advisors is a standardized means to prepare activity coordinators, teachers, school resource officers, community leaders, and others to conduct Certified i-MENTOR Trainings. By participating in the i-SAFE Student i-MENTOR Training, you will learn Internet safety practices. i-SAFE Certified i-MENTORs are students who are trained in Internet safety and want to educate others about being responsible cyber citizens. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Service-Learning Program for Advisors (VSLPA):
This online training will assist teachers, activity coordinators, counselors, school resource officers, community leaders, and others on how to integrate learning and community service, focused around internet safety and cyber security, as a civic responsibility. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Pre-Service Teacher Presentation (VPTP):
The online Pre-Service Teacher Presentation is an orientation presentation geared for higher education. It provides an overview of the safety and responsible-use issues associated with Internet access, an analysis of the role and responsibility of educators in addressing the issues, and an explanation about how i-SAFE certification can help. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Parent Program (VPNT):
The online Parent Program is designed to provide parents i-SAFE Internet safety information. An i-PARENT Program is the opportunity to get involved with raising Internet safety awareness throughout the community and your schools. An i-PARENT Board is usually formed from an i-PARENT Program. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Certified i-MENTOR Training for Students (VCMTS):
The online Certified i-MENTOR Training for Students is a standardized means for students to conduct Certified i-MENTOR Trainings. By participating in the i-SAFE Student i-MENTOR Training, you will learn the true meaning of "peer to peer" dealing with Internet safety and cyber security issues. i-SAFE Certified i-MENTORs are students who are trained in Internet safety and want to educate others about being responsible cyber citizens. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Assembly Training for Students (VASTS):
The online Assembly Experience Training for Students is a standardized means to prepare i-SAFE Student i-MENTORs to conduct school assemblies and train others to do the same. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Service-Learning Program for Students (VSLPS):
This online presentation will help prepare i-SAFE Student i-MENTORs on how to integrate learning and community service, focused around internet safety and cyber security, through Internet safety service-learning activities within your communities. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Dig Deeper Program on Cyber Bullying (VDDCB):
This online workshop provides an overview of emerging cyber-bullying issues with a focus on the empirical research and current relevant statistics. Participants will analyze the roles of all stakeholders in addressing cyber-bullying problems and will discuss options to meet these challenges within your schools and communities. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Dig Deeper Program on Acceptable Use Policy (VDDAUP):
This online workshop provides an overview of the need for an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) in every school environment as well as guidelines for the development of meaningful Acceptable Use Policies. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Virtual Best Practices and Implementation Strategies (VEBP):
This online workshop provides an overview of standards of learning relative to the implementation of internet safety and cyber security concepts within the classroom. Participants will have the ability to learn and understand new concepts through the implementation process of the i-SAFE curriculum. This online training will include the steps to implementation, an overview of implementation plans (IPs), a discussion of strategies to implement the i-SAFE program, and time for questions and answers. The training is ideal for people who completed i-LEARN and have questions about Best Practices and implementation. The training is offered online through the Virtual Training Academy.

Website:
A collection of "pages" or files on the World Wide Web that are linked together and managed by a company, institution or individual.

World Wide Web (WWW): Commonly called the Web, a large network of Internet servers providing hypertext and other services that allow one to use a computer to browse through a variety of linked resources.

Worm:
A self-propagating computer virus embedded in a file.

YE (Youth Empowerment): A very important part of the i-SAFE program in which students take ownership of what they have learned by reaching out to others. Peer-to-peer communication is the driving force behind Youth Empowerment.

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